MSKLC

In English
MSKLC is the abbreviation for Microsoft Keyboard Layout Creator, an extremely cool tool provided for Microsoft Windows. I have used it for quite some time now and also offered a download for my (German-based) phonetic Russian keyboard layout and one with Nordic letters. As of late I am moving to US-English keyboards because they suit me better for software development. Also, it means I don’t have to switch between keyboard layouts when at home and at work (where I already use a Cherry US-English keyboard way longer). There are two layouts which are based on the US layout and two which are based on the DE layout. In this section I only cover the US-based ones. Click on a pictures to get the enlarged version respectively.

In case you didn’t come from there, the downloads can be found here.

US-based plus German, Icelandic and Polish characters
I created this layout to suit my needs at work, where I work with Icelandic colleagues whose names often contain specific Icelandic letters. Since some of those letters have been used in Old English, the layout may even be suitable (or easily adaptable) to those in need for typing Old English texts. In addition to that I have often found myself typing German texts without the usual “latinized Umlauts” (ä -> ae, ö -> oe, ü -> ue and ß -> ss/sz) conversion but proper letters. I also found myself occasionally digging out Polish letters with cedilla and accents. All of this is now covered by this newest keyboard layout.

Lo and behold :)

Small letters (no combination with special keys):

Capital letters, Shift pressed:

AltGr (Ctrl+Alt), that’s the one right of the space bar, pressed:

AltGr+Shift (Ctrl+Alt+Shift) pressed:

Ctrl pressed:

Ctrl+Shift pressed:

This is kbdus_06, btw.

Russian, phonetic
In need for typing Russian text in chat with friends, for short blog entries or other stuff, this layout can be used whenever I have a US-English keyboard in front of me. IMO the US-English keyboard is the best to develop software. I presume the evolution was the other way around though and the programming languages matched the US-English layouts because of their authors. That’s why we have trigraphs to make C++ code even less readable ;)

Small letters:

Capital letters:

Ctrl+Alt pressed:

Ctrl+Alt+Shift pressed:

// Oliver